Accessibility.SkipToMainContent
Members at work

Tug AB Emily Reeves feel grateful to have a job and no student debt

14 May 2020

Do your research when considering a career at sea, Nautilus Champion and Tug AB Emily Reeves says. Speak to as many people as possible and work out what kind of ship you want to be on

What is a typical day in your job?

There isn't a typical day. Every day is different. Some days we may be standby for fire-fighting duties or engaged in all different types of towage. Even though tugs are smaller vessels we still have the same rules and regulations to follow as larger ships, so I can often be found checking safety equipment and doing our drills. I am currently working towards my Officer of the Watch (OOW), so that takes up some of my spare time.

Why did you choose a career at sea?

I originally started working in the ports, which I enjoyed, however I really wanted to be at sea.

Tell us some of your career highlights – and challenges – so far

Traveling to Australia to join a ship was exciting.

I also enjoyed my time working on the Dorset coast on pilot boats and tugs.

Passing my Boat Masters was an achievement and taking the boat out as skipper for the first time was a highlight.

Most crew members I have worked with are great and, as cheesy as it sounds, they do become your second family.

However, there are some challenges and some attitudes that still need to be addressed and changed. Unfortunately, some of these individuals are in a position of power.

How can seafarers be made to feel welcome and retained in a career at sea?

To be honest I think most just want to be treated fairly.

Most companies work contract to contract, so there is little chance of any maternity or paternity pay to enable people to stay at sea who have decided to start a family.

The old-school attitudes need to be addressed and changed, which they are… slowly.


Tags

More articles

Members at work

Cadet Ella Mackinem has never had a dull moment from the minute her educational compass was reset towards a career at sea

  • Telegraph
  • 24 July 2020
Members at work

Chief engineer Tenyon Latter says there is a vessel out there for everyone interested in maritime engineering

  • Telegraph
  • 22 July 2020
Members at work

Yacht deck officer James Sherwood enjoys speaking the 'global language' of the sea

  • Telegraph
  • 17 July 2020
Members at work

Cruiseship deck cadet Gareth Hampton recalls the thrill of taking the wheel for the first time

  • Telegraph
  • 20 July 2020
Members at work

Machinery at sea was made for third engineer Harley Vardakis

  • Telegraph
  • 20 July 2020
Members at work

Ex-Royal Naval officer Thomas Stapley-Bunten starts a second career in the Merchant Navy

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020
Members at work

Acting chief stewardess Sofiia Skorokhod steps up during the pandemic

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020
Members at work

Fascinated by the sea, Jamie Edwards finds lasting friendships and a camaraderie onboard unmatched elsewhere

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020
Members at work

Cadet David Pirie is speeding through his bucket list

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020
Members at work

Captain Stephen Gudgeon has spent forty years at sea and still revels in the magic of crossing the Panama Canal

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020
Members at work

Petra van den Corput thrives on deck with hard work and responsibility

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020
Members at work

Cruise ship Safety Officer Martel Fursdon juggles a busy schedule of port calls

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020
Members at work

Engineer Pavol Belina can feel like a glorified plumber while visiting paradise

  • Telegraph
  • 15 May 2020
Members at work

Harbour Master Dawn Franklyn relishes her 'second career' as a skipper and maritime professional

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020
Members at work

Third Officer Ross Cleland maxes his professional development

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020
Members at work

Deck Officer cadet Thomas Rapley follows in his grandfather's footsteps

  • Telegraph
  • 14 May 2020